The Secret To Your  Self-Motivation Lies In This Surprising Science-Backed Habit

The Secret To Your Self-Motivation Lies In This Surprising Science-Backed Habit

We can do anything we set our minds to. But sometimes it can feel like our brains are working against us when it comes to achieving our goals. Plans to learn a new skill, get in shape, or to save money and start a business, keep getting pushed back in the hopes that Future You will handle it “someday.” It’s a crippling behavioral cycle that can eat away at your self-motivation. In fact, in psychology, procrastination is classified as a form of self-sabotage. But there’s good news. While learning how to become self-motivated may feel difficult or nebulous, the potential solution is remarkably simple, according to Psychology Today and cognitive neuroscience. In their findings, a psychology professor at Harvard University, Ron Siegel, suggested that the key to following through on motivation boils down to this: bring optimism and fun back into the picture. This sounds a little hokey, right? After all, completing a term paper or your taxes isn’t exactly fun. While this habit seems anything but scientific, the neurological reasons behind it aren’t. According to the research, the reason we procrastinate on our ambitions lies in our primal psychology: “Our modern brains are still wired up for the ancient evolutionary purpose of surviving in a dangerous environment. Over a million years or so, we developed specialized neural structures that selectively tuned in to danger signals.” So when the time comes for us to create and be productive, instead of focusing on the pleasurable and rewarding aspects of obtaining our goals, our brains dwell on the anxiety and fear that comes along with doing something new or putting ourselves...